Category Archives: R

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R 3.1.1 is released (and how to quickly update it on Windows OS)

R 3.1.1 (codename “Sock it to Me“) was released today! You can get the latest binaries version from here. (or the .tar.gz source code from here). The full list of new features and bug fixes is provided below.

Upgrading to R 3.1.1 on Windows

If you are using Windows you can easily upgrade to the latest version of R using the installr package. Simply run the following code:

# installing/loading the latest installr package:
install.packages("installr"); require(installr) #load / install+load installr
 
updateR()

After running “updateR()”, the function will detect that R is available for you, and will download+install it (etc.).

Note that the latest installr version (0.15.3) was released just less than a month ago to CRAN, and it is recommended to upgrade to it, since it has more updated URLs to some software.
I try to keep the installr package updated and useful, so if you have any suggestions or remarks on the package – you are invited to leave a comment below.

If you use the global library system (as I do), you can run the following in the new version of R:

source("http://www.r-statistics.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/upgrading-R-on-windows.r.txt")
New.R.RunMe()

CHANGES IN R 3.1.1:

David smith gave a nice summary of the features here. And here is also the full list:

NEW FEATURES

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The dendextend package for visualizing and comparing trees of hierarchical clusterings (slides from useR!2014)

This week I presented in the useR!2014 my package dendextend (also on github), for easily manipulating, visualizing, and comparing dendrograms. Put simply, it is a package designed to easily create figures like these:

dendextend_01

Here is my presentation from useR:

Download (PDF, 8.42MB)

You are also invited to give a look to the current version of the package vignettes:

https://github.com/talgalili/dendextend/blob/master/vignettes/dendextend-tutorial.pdf

I highly welcome features suggestions and bug reports (or just “wow, this is awesome”) sent to my e-mail (tal.galili AT gmail.com), you can also leave a comment or use the github issue page.

A sidenote on useR!2014: this year’s useR conference was wonderful! I enjoyed the many talks, sessions, posters, and especially the so many wonderful R users I got to meet (and I will not try to list all of you – but you know who you are, and how much I enjoyed seeing you!). As corny as it may sound – we, the people who use R, are truly a community. There is a lot to be said about getting to meet so many people who share my own passion for statistical programming, open source, collaboration, open science, and a better future in general. Gladly, you can get a sense of what happened there by having a look at the twitter hashtag #useR2014. Several great R bloggers already started writing about it, you can see their posts here: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. And I hope more posts will follow. I hope to see you in next year’s useR!2015!

R 3.1.0 is released!

R 3.1.0 (codename “Spring Dance“) was released today!

hora jump
Photo credit: The Batsheva Dance Company in Ohad Naharin’s Hora. Photo by Gadi Dagon.

You can get the source code from
http://cran.r-project.org/src/base/R-3/R-3.1.0.tar.gz

or wait for it to be mirrored at a CRAN site nearer to you. Binaries for various platforms will appear in due course.

The full list of new features and bug fixes is provided below.

Upgrading to R 3.1.0

You can download the latest version from here.

If you are using Windows, it might take another 24 hours until you could update R. For convenience, you can upgrade to the latest version of R using the installr package. Simply run the following code:

# installing/loading the latest installr package:
install.packages("installr"); require(installr) #load / install+load installr
 
updateR()

After running “updateR()”, the function will detect that R is available for you, and will download+install it (etc.).

Note that the latest installr version (0.14.0) was released a week ago to CRAN, and it is recommended to upgrade to it, since it is now more robust for various extreme cases of upgrading R.
I try to keep the installr package updated and useful, so if you have any suggestions or remarks on the package – you are invited to leave a comment below.

If you use the global library system (as I do), you can run the following in the new version of R:

source("http://www.r-statistics.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/upgrading-R-on-windows.r.txt")
New.R.RunMe()

CHANGES IN R 3.1.0:

NEW FEATURES

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R 3.0.3 is released

R 3.0.3 (codename “Warm Puppy) was released several days ago. The full list of new features and bug fixes is provided below.

Upgrading to R 3.0.3

You can download the latest version from here. Or, if you are using Windows, you can upgrade to the latest version using the installr package. Simply run the following code:

# installing/loading the package:
if(!require(installr)) { 
install.packages("installr"); require(installr)} #load / install+load installr
 
updateR()

I try to keep the installr package updated and useful. If you have any suggestions or remarks on the package, you’re invited to leave a comment below.

If you use the global library system (as I do), you can run the following in the new version of R:

source("http://www.r-statistics.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/upgrading-R-on-windows.r.txt")
New.R.RunMe()

CHANGES IN R 3.0.3:

NEW FEATURES

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R-users.com: invite fellow R-users to Jobs, conferences, and R-projects

Dear R users,

I am happy to officially announce a new website called R-users.com. The idea of the site is that community members will invite other R users to join them in their R projects, conferences, and work places.

R-users_homepage_screeshot

This site is a “job board” for R users, hosting various “call to action” to R-users, to do stuff such as:

  1. Join a open-source or paid projects of R programming
  2. Send/give a presentation for conferences (on R, statistics, machine learning, data science, etc.)
  3. Apply to be a student/researcher in an academic institution
  4. And other “R jobs”

For example, I am the author of the R package “installr” for easily updating R on windows. However, I would love for someone who is a mac/linux user to expend my package for non-Windows users. Hence, I created a new “job”, inviting help on this project, which you may see in this link.

If you also wish to post your own “R job” for other R-users to see, here is a very short presentation on how to do it:

The basic steps are:

  1. Register/login to the site (you can use your facebook/gmail account with just one click-registration)
  2. Fill in your proposed project/job details
  3. That’s it!

I intend to promote this site on r-bloggers.com, please help me in promoting this site on facebook and your own websites – so that more of us will be able to work together.

Yours,
Tal Galili

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Plotly Beta: Collaborative Plotting with R

(Guest post by Matt Sundquist on a lovely new service which is pro-actively supporting an API for R)

The Plotly R graphing library  allows you to create and share interactive, publication-quality plots in your browser. Plotly is also built for working together, and makes it easy to post graphs and data publicly with a URL or privately to collaborators.

In this post, we’ll demo Plotly, make three graphs, and explain sharing. As we’re quite new and still in our beta, your help, feedback, and suggestions go a long way and are appreciated. We’re especially grateful for Tal’s help and the chance to post.

Installing Plotly

Sign-up and Install (more in documentation)

From within the R console:

install.packages("devtools")
library("devtools")

Next, install plotly (a big thanks to Hadley, who suggested the GitHub route):

devtools::install_github("plotly/R-api")
# ...
# * DONE (plotly)

Then sign-up like this or at https://plot.ly/:

>library(plotly)
>response = signup (username = 'username', email= 'youremail')
…
Thanks for signing up to plotly! 
 
Your username is: MattSundquist
 
Your temporary password is: pw. You use this to log into your plotly account at https://plot.ly/plot. Your API key is: “API_Key”. You use this to access your plotly account through the API.
 
To get started, initialize a plotly object with your username and api_key, e.g. 
>>> p < - plotly(username="MattSundquist", key="API_Key")
Then, make a graph!
>>> res < - p$plotly(c(1,2,3), c(4,2,1))

And we’re up and running! You can change and access your password and key in your homepage.

1. Overlaid Histograms:

Here is our first script.

library("plotly")
p < - plotly(username="USERNAME", key="API_Key")
 
x0 = rnorm(500)
x1 = rnorm(500)+1
data0 = list(x=x0,
             type='histogramx',
opacity=0.8)
data1 = list(x=x1,
             type='histogramx',
opacity=0.8)
layout = list(barmode='overlay')  
 
response = p$plotly(data0, data1, kwargs=list(layout=layout)) 
 
browseURL(response$url)

The script makes a graph. Use the RStudio viewer or add “browseURL(response$url)” to your script to avoid copy and paste routines of your URL and open the graph directly.

image001

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R-bloggers: an example of how interest networks propel viral events

A guest post by Jeff Hemsley, who has co-authored with Karine Nahon a new book titled Going Viral.
————————-

In Going Viral (Polity Press, 2013) we explore the topic of virality, the process of sharing messages that results in a fast, broad spread of information. What does that have to do R, or the R-bloggers community? First and foremost, we use the R-bloggers community as an example of the role of interest networks (see description below) in driving viral events. But we also used R as our go-to tool for our research that went into the book. Even the cover art, pictured here, was created with R, using the iGraph package. Included below is an excerpt from chapter 4 that includes the section on interest networks and R-bloggers.

GoingViral

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R 3.0.2 and RStudio 0.9.8 are released!

R 3.0.2 (codename “Frisbee Sailing”) was released yesterday. The full list of new features and bug fixes is provided below.

Also, RStudio v0.98 (in a “secret” preview) was announced two days ago with MANY new features, including:

Upgrading to R 3.0.2

You can download the latest version from here. Or, if you are using Windows, you can upgrade to the latest version using the installr package (also available on CRAN and github). Simply run the following code:

# installing/loading the package:
if(!require(installr)) { 
install.packages("installr"); require(installr)} #load / install+load installr
 
updateR(to_checkMD5sums = FALSE) # the use of to_checkMD5sums is because of a slight bug in the MD5 file on R 3.0.2. This issue is already resolved in the installr version on github, and will be released into CRAN in about a month from now..

I try to keep the installr package updated and useful. If you have any suggestions or remarks on the package, you’re invited to leave a comment below.

If you use the global library system (as I do), you can run the following in the new version of R:

source("http://www.r-statistics.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/upgrading-R-on-windows.r.txt")
New.R.RunMe()

p.s: you can also use the installr package to quickly install the new RStudio by using:

# installing/loading the package:
if(!require(installr)) { 
install.packages("installr"); require(installr)} #load / install+load installr
 
install.RStudio()

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