dendextend: a package for visualizing, adjusting, and comparing dendrograms (based on a paper from “bioinformatics”)

This post on the dendextend package is based on my recent paper from the journal bioinformatics (a link to a stable DOI). The paper was published just last week, and since it is released as CC-BY, I am permitted (and delighted) to republish it here in full:

abstract

Summary: dendextend is an R package for creating and comparing visually appealing tree diagrams. dendextend provides utility functions for manipulating dendrogram objects (their color, shape, and content) as well as several advanced methods for comparing trees to one another (both statistically and visually). As such, dendextend offers a flexible framework for enhancing R’s rich ecosystem of packages for performing hierarchical clustering of items.

Availability: The dendextend R package (including detailed introductory vignettes) is available under the GPL-2 Open Source license and is freely available to download from CRAN at: (http://cran.r-project.org/package=dendextend)

Contact: Tal.Galili@math.tau.ac.il

Continue reading dendextend: a package for visualizing, adjusting, and comparing dendrograms (based on a paper from “bioinformatics”)

dendextend version 1.0.1 + useR!2015 presentation

When using the dendextend package in your work, please cite it using:

Tal Galili (2015). dendextend: an R package for visualizing, adjusting, and comparing trees of hierarchical clustering. Bioinformatics. doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btv428

My R package dendextend (version 1.0.1) is now on CRAN!

The dendextend package Offers a set of functions for extending dendrogram objects in R, letting you visualize and compare trees of hierarchical clusterings. With it you can (1) Adjust a tree’s graphical parameters – the color, size, type, etc of its branches, nodes and labels. (2) Visually and statistically compare different dendrograms to one another.

The previous release of dendextend (0.18.3) was half a year ago, and this version includes many new features and functions.

To help you discover how dendextend can solve your dendrogram/hierarchical-clustering issues, you may consult one of the following vignettes:

Here is an example figure from the first vignette (analyzing the Iris dataset)

iris_heatmap_dend

 

This week, at useR!2015, I will give a talk on the package. This will offer a quick example, and a step-by-step example of some of the most basic/useful functions of the package. Here are the slides:

 

Lastly, I would like to mention the new d3heatmap package for interactive heat maps. This package is by Joe Cheng from Rstudio, and integrates well with dendrograms in general and dendextend in particular (thanks to some lovely github-commit-discussion between Joe and I). You are invited to see lively examples of the package in the post at the RStudio blog. Here is just one quick example:

d3heatmap(nba_players, colors = “Blues”, scale = “col”, dendrogram = “row”, k_row = 3)

d3heatmap

The dendextend package for visualizing and comparing trees of hierarchical clusterings (slides from useR!2014)

When using the dendextend package in your work, please cite it using:

Tal Galili (2015). dendextend: an R package for visualizing, adjusting, and comparing trees of hierarchical clustering. Bioinformatics. doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btv428

This week I presented in the useR!2014 my package dendextend (also on github), for easily manipulating, visualizing, and comparing dendrograms. Put simply, it is a package designed to easily create figures like these:

2015-06-28 20_58_26-Clipboard

Here is my presentation from useR: